Moringa: How It Can Be Used

There are a ton of ways you can use Moringa. We’ll be focusing on 3 ways you can introduce moringa into a community to help fight malnutrition.

moringa

1. Using Moringa as Food or a Dietary Supplement

Moringa is packed with essential nutrients. The leaves can be eaten and added to salads and stir fry. You can eat the leaves by themself but they lacks flavor, in my opinion, so I like to add it to other foods. They are also great to add to smoothies and shakes. Before you eat the leaf make sure you rinse them thoroughly. Washing the leaves prevent you from ingesting pesticides that may have been used on the trees.

How about the seeds? Are they edible? There is debate on whether or not it is safe to eat Moringa seeds. This is in part because the seeds are known to cleanse your digestive system so some argue that eating too many can cause dehydration. Others enjoy eating them in small amounts. Some even pop them like traditional corn cernal popcorn. However, it’s important to note that if you are going to try Moringa seeds notify your physician for possible side effects and advisement.

The root! The root! The root is on fire! Okay, that was a corny joke but let’s talk about the Moringa root. It is not recommended to eat the Morninga root. “(the root)…of the plant may contain a toxic substance that can cause paralysis and death.” While, this is still being studied, it’s probably a safe bet to not eat it.

The pods- The pods of the Moringa plant are often eaten in stews. In order to eat the pod you have to pick it at exactly the right time or it will be too tough to eat. There is conflicting information on eating the pod so do your research before you try to prepare it. With that said in order to eat it you have first boil it and then scrape out the inside of the pod. There may be other ways of eating it but this is the only I’ve heard of and honestly I’ve never eaten the pods so I can’t tell you how good it is or how horrible it is.

The Flowers- “…The flowers can be eaten when cooked and many say that the taste resembles a mushroom flavor.”

2. As a Medicine

There are many emerging studies on the use of Moringa for medicinal purposes. Some of these medical purposes are treatments from hunger related health issues. I’m not a doctor and do not have the knowledge or expertise to suggest medical treatments. However, if you are interested in the use of Moringa as a medical treatment ask your physician or contact an herbalist for more information.

3. To Clean Water

Both Moringa seeds and Moringa powder can be used to filtered water. It takes a lot of Moringa seeds to filter a small amount of water so other methods should be considered first. Also, the powder can be expensive so this method is not always the best either. However, if you are in an area where you have an abundance of Moringa trees and need clean water then this may be a solution. Learn more here. Clean water can help reduce malnutrition in hunger ridden communities. Utilizing your Moringa trees in these villages to combat unclean water is a great way to prevent health issues developed from unclean water.

Those are 3 ways you can use Moringa in communities. The first way, as a healthy food source, is probably the most common. Wednesday you’ll learn how to introduce Moringa into a community and where to find cuttings, seeds, and planting information.

Disclaimer: Information expressed in this article is solely the opinion of the writer. The writer is not held liable for any damage or health concerns resulting from information or endorsement from this article. If in doubt, always contact a health professional before using a new product on yourself or others.

*Article not sponsored by suggested companies.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: